Jun

The intern diaries: The first two weeks

by Jules Miller
Marketing & Digital Intern at Charles Aris Executive Search

As a new Charles Aris Executive Search marketing intern working in a remote environment, I learned many things over my first two weeks. I wanted to share some tips and tricks for navigating the first two weeks of any internship to give you some perspective on your next remote, in-person or hybrid opportunity.

Be punctual

As someone who is a heavy sleeper, I knew working a remote job would require me to put more effort into getting out of bed in a timely manner, along with giving myself time to fully wake up and be ready for the workday. Though it might sound ridiculous, I knew what would work best for me: Setting several alarms in the morning. This way, I could wake up and have plenty of time for my brain to wake up as well. I took this philosophy into how I approach work meetings, ensuring that a reminder went off 15 minutes before every meeting, and that I never logged off without knowing what the next day’s schedule looked like.

Plan your time

Another technique that kept me from being overwhelmed by the workday was to know in advance what the next day’s meeting schedule was and what I planned to do when I wasn’t in a meeting. This way, I could practice self-discipline more easily and waste less time when I wasn’t learning more about Charles Aris through an orientation session or learning more about the future of my work with the marketing team. This structure kept me driven and focused on my tasks rather than unsure and aimless of what to do next.

Jot it down

With any internship, you’re going to be learning. That may be learning more about the organization you’re working for, the type of work you’ll be doing or how you fit into the larger corporate environment. While your internship might not require you to remember every detail, I’ve found that taking notes – whether by hand or digitally – has drastically improved my own ability to remember the ins and outs of the professional sphere I now live in. I’m creating a library of knowledge that’s tailored to my own thought process. I also made sure to ask for copies of any presentations that were used so I could refer to them.

Take pause

While this tip is more catered to the remote intern experience, it can also apply to an in-person or hybrid internship. When setting up or getting accustomed to the variety of programs and technology you’re expected to use in the workplace, try not to stress yourself out if you have difficulties. Scrambling to fix something quickly can prolong your problem, which is not always as big of a problem as it may seem. In my case, my audio cut out after connecting my headphones during a video call meeting. I was anxious immediately, worried that I would miss valuable information. I connected, reconnected and restarted my computer after letting those in the meeting know what was happening. In my panic, I hadn’t realized that my audio settings were set to my speaker instead of my headphones – an easy fix that I would’ve caught sooner had I not stressed myself out over it. Take pause and don’t rush yourself when these things happen; communicate with your team when you’re struggling and you’ll find them to be understanding and helpful.

You’re not alone

The most important thing for me to remember during the first two weeks of adjustment was that everyone I’m working with wants to help me succeed. I wouldn’t be a part of this internship opportunity if my Charles Aris teammates weren’t interested in me, my career and my success. I think that’s a key takeaway for any intern – everyone you’re working with wants to help you succeed and you don’t have to hold back if you have questions. You might be worried about making a bad impression, but your coworkers can’t help you if they don’t know you need help. In my time so far, I’ve been warmly welcomed and reassured that I’m truly part of the team, and in my experience, being part of a team means that you can rely on your fellow teammates so you all can do the best possible work together.